Office Phone: 217-357-6056

WCAZ Radio News Archives for 2024-04

Sandburg hosting career fair May 2 featuring 8 Illinois agencies

Sandburg hosting career fair May 2 featuring 8 Illinois agencies

 Carl Sandburg College will host a mini career fair from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. May 2 in the Student Center on its Galesburg campus for those interested in employment opportunities with Illinois government agencies.

 

Job seekers can explore and learn about careers with eight state agencies that will be on site:

  • Department of Central Management Services
  • Department of Children and Family Services
  • Department of Corrections
  • Department of Innovation and Technology
  • Department of Transportation
  • Illinois State Police
  • Office of the State Treasurer
  • Western Illinois Works

 

The event, sponsored by the Illinois Department of Employment Security, is free and open to the public. For more information, visit illinoisjoblink.com, or contact Tracy Engstrom, Sandburg’s coordinator of career development, at 309.341.5246 or tengstrom@sandburg.edu

Sandburg hosting career fair May 2 featuring 8 Illinois agencies

Sandburg hosting career fair May 2 featuring 8 Illinois agencies

 Carl Sandburg College will host a mini career fair from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. May 2 in the Student Center on its Galesburg campus for those interested in employment opportunities with Illinois government agencies.

 

Job seekers can explore and learn about careers with eight state agencies that will be on site:

  • Department of Central Management Services
  • Department of Children and Family Services
  • Department of Corrections
  • Department of Innovation and Technology
  • Department of Transportation
  • Illinois State Police
  • Office of the State Treasurer
  • Western Illinois Works

 

The event, sponsored by the Illinois Department of Employment Security, is free and open to the public. For more information, visit illinoisjoblink.com, or contact Tracy Engstrom, Sandburg’s coordinator of career development, at 309.341.5246 or tengstrom@sandburg.edu

Sandburg hosting career fair May 2 featuring 8 Illinois agencies

Sandburg hosting career fair May 2 featuring 8 Illinois agencies

 Carl Sandburg College will host a mini career fair from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. May 2 in the Student Center on its Galesburg campus for those interested in employment opportunities with Illinois government agencies.

 

Job seekers can explore and learn about careers with eight state agencies that will be on site:

  • Department of Central Management Services
  • Department of Children and Family Services
  • Department of Corrections
  • Department of Innovation and Technology
  • Department of Transportation
  • Illinois State Police
  • Office of the State Treasurer
  • Western Illinois Works

 

The event, sponsored by the Illinois Department of Employment Security, is free and open to the public. For more information, visit illinoisjoblink.com, or contact Tracy Engstrom, Sandburg’s coordinator of career development, at 309.341.5246 or tengstrom@sandburg.edu

Sandburg hosting career fair May 2 featuring 8 Illinois agencies

Sandburg hosting career fair May 2 featuring 8 Illinois agencies

 Carl Sandburg College will host a mini career fair from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. May 2 in the Student Center on its Galesburg campus for those interested in employment opportunities with Illinois government agencies.

 

Job seekers can explore and learn about careers with eight state agencies that will be on site:

  • Department of Central Management Services
  • Department of Children and Family Services
  • Department of Corrections
  • Department of Innovation and Technology
  • Department of Transportation
  • Illinois State Police
  • Office of the State Treasurer
  • Western Illinois Works

 

The event, sponsored by the Illinois Department of Employment Security, is free and open to the public. For more information, visit illinoisjoblink.com, or contact Tracy Engstrom, Sandburg’s coordinator of career development, at 309.341.5246 or tengstrom@sandburg.edu

Capitol Briefs: Expansion of postpartum coverage, ban on kangaroos among hundreds of measures to pass House

Capitol Briefs: Expansion of postpartum coverage, ban on kangaroos among hundreds of measures to pass House

Lawmakers also outlaw AI-generated child porn, fine-tune prisoner medical release law 

 

SPRINGFIELD – Illinois kangaroo owners are one step closer to being forced to surrender their marsupials this week after the House passed a bill criminalizing their possession.

That was one of more than 300 bills to pass the House ahead of a Friday procedural deadline.  

If it becomes law, House Bill 4446 would expand the list of outlawed animals to include two species of wild cats –  servals and caracals – along with wallabies and kangaroos. Animals, like lions, tigers and bears are already banned from being pets under current law. 

Bill sponsor Rep. Daniel Didech, D-Buffalo Grove, assured Rep. Charlie Meier, R-Okawville, his district’s petting zoo would be allowed to keep its kangaroo, assuming it is under the care of a licensed handler. 

“We are not closing petting zoos in Illinois,” Didech said during debate. “This is actually a very serious bill that was brought to me by law enforcement.”

He said it was in response to aggressive animal encounters in Vernon Hills, Decatur and Bloomington.

The bill currently grants exemptions for films produced in Illinois to use outlawed animals. It also prevents veterinarians who administer emergency medicine to banned animals from being sued unless it’s a case of malpractice. 

The penalty for illegally owning one of the illegal animals remains a Class C misdemeanor. The measure passed the House 67-34 and heads to the Senate.

 

AI-generated child porn

A bill that would outlaw the creation and sharing of child pornography made using artificial intelligence unanimously advanced to the Senate this week. 

House Bill 4623, which was backed by Attorney General Kwame Raoul, would expand current child pornography laws to also cover AI-generated child pornography.

The bill sponsor, Rep. Jennifer Gong-Gershowitz, D-Glenview, said if AI-generated child pornography rapidly increases, law enforcement’s ability to identify real cases would be more difficult. She also said “while no real child may be harmed with AI-generated content, the harm is that it normalizes abusive behavior” by depicting the crime. 

 

Pregnancy and postpartum care

A bill expanding insurance coverage of pregnancy, postpartum and newborn care advanced to the Senate Thursday as well.

Under House Bill 5142, which is backed by Gov. JB Pritzker, insurance coverage through certain state-regulated plans would be extended to include doulas, midwives, home births, lactation consultants, breastfeeding supplies and more. Other insurance plans, like those federally regulated under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act, or ERISA, would be excluded. 

The bill’s sponsor, Rep. Robyn Gabel, D-Evanston, said she thinks increasing coverage of this type of care will save women’s and babies’ lives. 

Financial experts estimate implementing these changes would cost the Department of Insurance $260,000. 

The bill passed out of the House 72-37. During debate, a few Republicans expressed concerns with this coverage also being extended to people undergoing abortion services. 

 

Junk Fees Ban

 A proposal to bar companies that aren’t already subject to price regulations from imposing “junk fees” on consumers passed the House Thursday in a 71-35 vote.

House Bill 4629, called the Junk Fee Ban Act, would require companies to provide consumers with the full price of the provided goods or services thereby removing back-end, hidden fees. 

Bill sponsor Rep. Bob Morgan, D-Deerfield, said when he was recently at a restaurant, the receipt listed a surcharge to cover the increased cost of food rather than increasing the prices on the menu. His bill would ban such practices and increase transparency, he said.

“Junk fees are exactly what they sound like. They're hidden, deceptive, predatory fees. They're added by businesses without you knowing,” Morgan said Thursday. “And they exploit each and every one of us for their extra profit.”

 

Climate Change Curriculum

The House passed a measure that requires the Illinois State Board of Education – if funding is appropriated by lawmakers – to provide professional development to teachers regarding climate change curriculum.

Bill sponsor Rep. Janet Yang Rohr, D-Naperville, said teaching the topic of climate change is already required within the state’s school code due to its adoption of the Next Generation Science Standards. Those standards have been adopted by 44 states around the country, she added. 

The proposal would give ISBE the authority to provide training materials to teachers based on that curriculum.

House Bill 4895 passed the House in a 70-37 vote Thursday with only Democratic support. 

The proposal would require a one-time $300,000 expense, which would need to be approved separately, according to Yang Rohr. 

 

Prisoner Medical Release Hearings

A bill to add transparency and reporting measures to prisoner medical release hearings passed in a 72-34 vote Wednesday.

House Bill 5396 would amend the Joe Coleman Medical Release Act, which took effect in 2022. That law established the process for an inmate to petition the Prisoner Review Board for an early release due to terminal illness or medical disability. 

Rep. Will Guzzardi, D-Chicago, said the bill aims “to make sure PRB complies with the letter and the spirit of the original law.”

“It's my view that there are individuals who are perhaps eligible for release under this Act who haven't been able to take advantage of it yet,” Guzzardi said. “But in order for us to really make sure that that happens, we have to have these hearings working right.”

Read more: INJUSTICE WATCH/WBEZ: Dying and disabled Illinois prisoners kept behind bars, despite new medical release law

The bill clarifies that hearings concerning a prisoner’s potential release are public by default unless requested to be closed by the petitioning inmate. The petitioner has the right to attend the hearing to speak on their own behalf. 

The bill would also require the PRB to provide public notice including the petitioner’s name and attorney, the docket number, and the hearing date. Voting would take place during the public hearing. If the petition is denied, the PRB must publish a decision letter outlining the statutory reason for denial and an estimated cost, including medical expenses, of keeping the inmate incarcerated. 

 

Capitol News Illinois is a nonprofit, nonpartisan news service covering state government. It is distributed to hundreds of print and broadcast outlets statewide. It is funded primarily by the Illinois Press Foundation and the Robert R. McCormick Foundation, along with major contributions from the Illinois Broadcasters Foundation and Southern Illinois Editorial Association.

Pritzker says state 'obviously' needs to change 2010 law that shrunk pension benefits

Pritzker says state ‘obviously’ needs to change 2010 law that shrunk pension benefits

 

With a month-and-a-half left in the General Assembly’s spring session, Gov. JB Pritzker’s administration is readying its proposal to address Illinois’ chronically underfunded pension system.

But the governor this week also acknowledged in the strongest terms yet that any plans to finally get the state on track toward fully funding retirement plans for public school teachers, university employees and state workers could be derailed by a looming legal fight over a 14-year-old law.

Pritzker’s comments came as Illinois’ two influential statewide teachers unions were wrapping up a “week of action,” encouraging their members to call and email lawmakers and urge them to essentially “undo” a 2010 law that created a new less generous pension system for those who began their jobs after Jan. 1, 2011.

The General Assembly and then-Democratic Gov. Pat Quinn quickly approved that law in the wake of the Great Recession, which forced state leaders to grapple with decades of underfunding in Illinois’ pension systems. 

But in the years since, economists and labor leaders have repeatedly warned that the retirement benefits in the Tier 2 system are so low, they might violate federal “Safe Harbor” laws. Those laws dictate Social Security replacement plans, like pensions, can’t offer benefits that don’t at least match Social Security. 

Lawmakers – the majority of whom were not in the legislature when Tier 2 was passed – have picked up on those warning signs, and in the last few years have been studying the issue in occasional committee hearings. In February, Pritzker signaled his willingness to get ahead of the looming legal issue, and on Thursday he took a big step forward in his position.

“We need, obviously, to make some changes to Tier 2 to make sure that we're meeting the Social Security Safe Harbor,” the governor said at an unrelated news conference late Thursday night in his Capitol office. “We don't yet really know what that's going to cost.”

Earlier in the day, Pritzker’s top budget advisor, Governor’s Office of Management and Budget Director Alexis Sturm, told a House committee that the governor was “open to that conversation” about increasing the cap on Tier 2 pension earnings to match Social Security.

Ahead of Pritzker’s annual budget address in February, Sturm and other top staffers laid out a larger plan to address Illinois’ underfunded pension systems, which included a nod to the Social Security issue.

Read more: With budget proposal and fiery address, Pritzker paints himself as progressive pragmatist

At the time, the plan merely encouraged the boards of the state's retirement systems for teachers, university employees and state employees, along with the legislature, to “review and adjust, if necessary, the structure of the Tier 2 pensionable earnings cap.”

But in acknowledging the Tier 2 issue on Thursday, the governor also signaled to New York-based credit ratings agencies that he was still committed to fiscal moves that would earn the state further credit upgrades. Pritzker said state leaders “just need to be exceedingly careful” about pension “sweeteners” – including any fix made to Tier 2 pensions.

“So that, in a way, is a sweetener in the sense that it's going to cost taxpayers something,” Pritzker said. “But we have to do it because the alternative would cost the taxpayers much more.”

There is no official price tag on tweaking the law to comply with Social Security rules, but one analysis run for the state’s Commission on Government Forecasting and Accountability last year estimated it could cost the state $5.6 billion through 2045, or about $255 million annually.

 

Path to 2048

Sturm’s appearance in a House committee Thursday was intended to sell lawmakers on the governor’s plan to fully fund Illinois’ pensions by 2048. Pritzker’s team had laid out the proposal ahead of his budget address in February, and one credit rating agency immediately signaled its approval.

Read more: Pritzker proposes over $2B in spending growth, backed by tax increases for corporations, sportsbooks

The plan would alter a 1995 law signed by then-Republican Gov. Jim Edgar that put the state on a 50-year ramp to get Illinois’ pension systems to a 90 percent funded level by 2045.

Pritzker wants to extend that deadline three more years, but up the funding goal to 100 percent. He’s also pushing to keep spending half of the amount of money Illinois is currently spending on debt repayment for old bonds taken out in 2003 and 2017 when they’re retired in the early 2030s and put that money toward the pension systems.

The 2003 bonds were taken out to pay for pensions during Democratic Gov. Rod Blagojevich’s administration, and the 2017 bonds were sold in the aftermath of the state’s two-year budget impasse under Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner to help pay down Illinois’ record near-$17 billion backlog of unpaid bills accumulated during the political struggle.

Sturm called the plan a “balanced” way to address Illinois’ longstanding practice of not paying enough into its pension systems, creating an ever-growing sum of unfunded liabilities.

“It was there in the ‘90s, it was there in the ‘70s and the ‘40s,” Sturm said of the pension debt.

She also clarified that Pritzker is “not interested” in issuing any bonds to put an infusion of cash into the state’s pension systems, a move made under Quinn in 2010 and 2011 several years after the state borrowed $10 billion in the 2003 bond sale under Blagojevich.

Thursday’s discussion on the pension plan was subject matter only, meaning it did not receive a vote from the committee. It’s unclear if the measure will pass before lawmakers adjourn their spring session in May.

Just as in the past, public employee unions will likely have tremendous influence over whether the legislature approves the governor’s pension plan.

Pat Devaney, the secretary-treasurer of the Illinois AFL-CIO organized labor umbrella organization, told the panel Thursday that the We Are One Illinois coalition – a group of unions that formed after the Tier 2 pension system law passed – was not yet taking a stance on Pritzker’s plan.

“It is difficult to provide comprehensive comments on the governor’s proposal without having specific legislative language and funding projections to review,” he said. “That said, the problematic nature of the current funding ramp is well-documented.”

The coalition, Devaney said, “generally” supports making larger-than-necessary contributions to the state’s retirement systems.

“The state has always set forward with a plan to underfund the pension systems,” he said. “We’re encouraged that the governor has a plan to actually fund it to 100 percent and come out with a deliberate, responsible way to provide that funding.”

 

Tier 2 history

But Devaney had a much more strident position to share with House members about Tier 2 pensions.

“We can do that,” he said of Pritzker’s plan to shore up Illinois’ pension systems. “But we can also address the illegal, immoral, and, frankly, things that are hurting the operations of government at every level with the Tier 2 benefit level.”

After a long pause, state Rep. Steve Reick, R-Woodstock, signaled his agreement – with a big caveat.

“Yeah, but how?” Reick said. “That’s the thing that we need to get people together in a room and talk about because this isn’t gonna get any better for the next 20 years. I’m not going to be here 20 years from now but...I’d like to leave knowing that we started something that would get us to where we want to be.”

Reick said his email inbox has been inundated with messages about the Tier 2 pension system. The Illinois Federation of Teachers and Illinois Education Association – the state’s two largest teachers unions – have encouraged their members to flood their local lawmakers with requests to address the Tier 2 pension system.

As of Thursday evening, union members had sent more than 55,000 letters this week to lawmakers urging them to “fix” Tier 2 pensions, according to the Illinois AFL-CIO.

“I mean, I get a lot of emails from people who demand that we do away with Tier 2 altogether and go back to Tier 1,” Reick said later on during the hearing. “Um, that’s not going to work.”

As Illinois began its slow recovery from the Great Recession, lawmakers were facing a sudden jump in unfunded pension liabilities, due in part to poor investment returns as the stock market hobbled its way to recovery. But the General Assembly also felt the squeeze from decades of decisions from their predecessors shorting the state’s pension systems. 

Beginning in 2009, credit rating agencies began a series of downgrades to Illinois’ ratings of creditworthiness, making it more expensive for the state to borrow money via bond sales. In explaining their reasoning at the time, the influential agencies repeatedly noted the state’s pension systems were underfunded. 

The financial downturn came not long after the state skipped out on paying half of its pension obligation for two years under Blagojevich, which came on the heels of more than 11,000 state workers taking early retirement under Republican Gov. George Ryan. Both moves increased the liability to the state’s pension systems by billions of dollars.

So in 2010, the Democratic-controlled General Assembly created the new Tier 2 system, which nixed the Tier 1 practice of 3 percent compounded annual cost of living adjustments for retirees, raised the age for retirees to get full benefits from 62 to 67 and changed eligibility for full benefits from five years of service to 10 years. 

Tier 2 also caps the maximum salary a pension can be based on and changes the calculation of the base salary to discourage a practice known as pension “spiking,” wherein those close to retirement age would seek raises to substantially increase their pension under the Tier 1 system.

Because it takes a decade to “vest” in the Tier 2 pension system, those who made late-career switches to government employment have begun to be eligible for retirement only in the last few years. 

 

Capitol News Illinois is a nonprofit, nonpartisan news service covering state government. It is distributed to hundreds of newspapers, radio and TV stations statewide. It is funded primarily by the Illinois Press Foundation and the Robert R. McCormick Foundation, along with major contributions from the Illinois Broadcasters Foundation and Southern Illinois Editorial Association.

MEMORIAL HOSPITAL FOUNDATION TO HOST BOOK FAIR

MEMORIAL HOSPITAL FOUNDATION TO HOST BOOK FAIR

Carthage, IL – Memorial Hospital Foundation is pleased to announce the upcoming
“Midwest Book Fairs” Book & Gift Fair! The Book & Gift Fair will take place Wednesday,
May 1, 2024, from 7:30 am – 4:00 pm, in the front lobby and hallways of Memorial Hospital
at 1454 NCR 2050, Carthage, IL 62321. We cordially invite the public to join us for this
exciting shopping opportunity!
All proceeds from the Book & Gift Fair will benefit the Memorial Hospital Foundation’s
“Grow Our Own” Scholarship Campaign, which aims to provide scholarships for Memorial
Hospital and Hancock County Senior & Childcare Services employees pursuing further
education in the healthcare field. The scholarships will also serve as a means to recruit and
retain healthcare resources in Hancock County.
For further information on the Book & Gift Fair or the Foundation’s “Grow Our Own”
Campaign, don’t hesitate to contact Katelyn Murphy, Memorial Hospital Foundation
Communications Coordinator, at kmurphy@mhtlc.org or 217-357-8568.

Memorial Institute of Health & Healing Introduces New Way to Treat the Cause of Allergies

Memorial Institute of Health & Healing Introduces New Way to Treat the Cause of

Allergies

 

Though there are 50-60 million allergy sufferers in the U.S., only a fraction receive
treatment that can change the underlying disease. Instead, most suffer from their symptoms, try to avoid problem allergens or treat symptoms temporarily with prescriptions and over-the-counter medications. But now allergy sufferers at Memorial Institute of Health & Healing have another option for treating the cause — not just the symptoms — of their allergies.


Memorial Institute of Health & Healing, located at the Memorial Medical Building in Carthage, Illinois, has introduced area allergy sufferers to sublingual immunotherapy, or allergy drop immunotherapy. Like allergy injections, allergy drops help patients build long-term tolerance to their allergies. Instead of receiving small amounts of substances that cause reactions in an injection, patients self-administer the treatment as a liquid drop placed under the tongue. Here, specialized cells receive the allergen and can
safely train the body to tolerate, rather than react to, problem allergens.


The practice uses a thorough medical history, exam, and specific testing to determine what the patient is allergic to and their level of sensitivity. “This information lets us create a personalized treatment that is geared specifically to that patient’s allergy fingerprint, allowing us to treat them in a way that’s matched specifically to their needs,” says Yoon Hang Kim, MD, Chief Wellness Officer at Memorial Hospital.


Because allergy drops have added safety benefits, a broader range of patients can be treated, including young children, asthmatics, patients who can’t tolerate shots, highly sensitive patients, and those with other related chronic conditions. Along with seasonal allergies, allergy drops have been shown to be effective for patients with food and mold allergies, allergic asthma, and eczema.


“We’re excited to provide patients who haven’t responded to other treatments with an option that could provide a long-term solution to their allergy problems,” says Dr. Kim.
Memorial Institute of Health &  Healing combines its expertise in allergy treatment with the La Crosse Method™ Protocol, which has been refined over 50 years of clinical and research expertise. Dr. Kim adds, “Though the treatment may be new to the area, we base our treatment on methods used to effectively treat patients across the country for more than five decades.”
For more information about allergy drop treatments or to schedule an appointment, contact Memorial Insititute of Health &  Healing at 217-357-6815.

####
Headshot: Yoon Hang Kim, MD, Chief Wellness Officer

Memorial MedSpa Introduces Innovative Vagilangelo® Service for Women's Wellness

Memorial MedSpa Introduces Innovative Vagilangelo® Service for Women's  Wellness

Carthage, IL – Memorial MedSpa is proud to announce the introduction of a groundbreaking new service aimed at enhancing women' s wellness: Vagilangelo®. Located at Memorial Medical Clinic on 630 Locust St., Memorial MedSpa is renowned for providing premium beauty and wellness treatments designed to elevate both appearance and confidence.


Led by the esteemed Dr. Gina Bell, Memorial MedSpa is committed to upholding the highest standards of care for female patients. Dr. Bell's dedication to promoting holistic healthcare approaches has led to the introduction of Vagilangelo®, a revolutionary procedure developed by Dr. Marashi to address women's intimate wellness concerns.


Vagilangelo® was conceptualized by Dr. Marashi in response to the growing demand for minimally invasive options to improve women's intimacy. With a focus on effectiveness, convenience, and patient comfort, Vagilangelo® is designed to be completed in 30 minutes or less under local anesthesia. Utilizing a dual-sound approach that incorporates biomechanical and biochemical elements, Vagilangelo® restores angles that have been compromised or even lost completely with aging, post-partum trauma, and/or
genetics. Restoration of this angle will lead to increased satisfaction in both the female and male during intimacy.


Dr. Marashi's mission extends beyond innovation; he aims to destigmatize discussions around sexual wellness and empower women to prioritize their well-being without shame or hesitation. Memorial MedSpa shares this commitment to open and honest dialogue surrounding women's health, emphasizing the importance of education and self-care at every stage of life.
In addition to Vagilangelo®, Memorial MedSpa offers a wide range of beauty and wellness treatments, including skin tightening, anti-aging therapies, and treatments for various pain conditions. 

"At Memorial MedSpa, we are dedicated to enhancing the overall well-being of our patients, and we arethrilled to introduce Vagilangelo® as part of our comprehensive approach to women's wellness,"says Dr. Bell."We believe that every woman deserves to feel empowered and confident in her own skin, and we are committed to providing innovative solutions that support their journey towards health and happiness."
For more information about Vagilangelo® and other services offered at Memorial MedSpa, visit https://memorialmedspa.com or contact Memorial MedSpa at 217-357-6560.

####

Pictured at training left to right are Jan Gewal, MD, OB/GYN; Gina Bell, MD, OB/GYN; Amir Marashi, MD, OB/GYN; Kambiz Tajkarimi, MD; Kimberly Evans, MD, OB/GYN

Rep. Dan Swanson - Swanson legislation to better educate drivers on Scott's Law given House approval

Rep. Dan Swanson - Swanson legislation to better educate drivers on Scott's Law given House approval

State Representative Dan Swanson (R-Alpha) passed legislation out of the Illinois House of Representatives today to better educate motorists about Scott’s Law, the Illinois statute which requires drivers to move over or slow down when they see emergency vehicles with flashing lights on the roadside.

 

House Bill 4711 provides that if an applicant gives an incorrect response to a question on the written portion of the driver's license examination concerning driver responsibilities when approaching a stationary emergency vehicle, disabled vehicle, or highway construction, then the Secretary of State shall provide the applicant with information concerning those provisions.

 

The legislation was brought to Representative Swanson by ROWVA High School junior Lucy Kuelper in his district.  The bill now heads to the Senate for their consideration

 

Cancellations and Postponements for April 16th

April 16th 2024

 Hancock-Henderson County COAD Mtg,            Postponed  potentially until April 30

Warsaw Chamber Meeting                                      Postponed to  Wednesday April 17th-                        Dinner  5pm at Jennifers family resturant    meeting to follow

 

Illini West Charger Baseball                Rescheduled to Wednesday April 17th  4:30 Carthage

Illini West Charger Softball                     Cancelled willl not be made up

Next Meeting of the Henderson-Hancock COAD Scheduled for April 16, HAS BEEN POSTPONED DUR TO PREDICTED SEVERE WEATHER

Next Meeting of the Henderson-Hancock COAD Scheduled for April 16, HAS BEEN POSTPONED DUR TO PREDICTED SEVERE WEATHER

After listening in to the NWS Update for the severe Weather predicted for tomorrow- in consultation with both the Hancock and Henderson County Emergency Managers, we are postponing the Hancock-Henderson County COAD Mtg, potentially until April 30.  More Information with follow when details for the reschedule have been  worked out!  We apologize for the late notice, but given the likelihood of hail, strong winds, and tornado throughout the region, keeping everyone safe seems prudent.

Get a Jump on Seasonal Allergies Before they Attack

Get a Jump on Seasonal Allergies Before they Attack

 

–If you suffer from seasonal allergies, you could get a jump on the upcoming
season with a therapy aimed at helping you reduce symptoms before they start and helping you build long-term tolerance. Available at the Memorial Institute of Health & Healing, sublingual immunotherapy or allergy drops could help you build tolerance to essential tree or grass pollen allergies. The objective? Fewer symptoms are observed once pollens are in full bloom, and ultimately, symptoms are eliminated. Sublingual immunotherapy works similarly to allergy shots. However, doses of allergens are delivered under the tongue in a liquid form.


Spring’s blooming trees and grass can impact nearly 20 percent of the population. Hay fever, or seasonal allergic rhinitis, affects an estimated 40 to 60 million Americans and causes symptoms like sneezing, itchy and watery eyes, runny nose, and a burning or itchy sensation in the throat or palate. Spring allergies are mostly commonly caused by tree and grass pollen. However, spring molds can release spores into the air and impact allergy sufferers. Wet winters can provide an ideal breeding ground for mold.


Seasonal weather fluctuations can affect the severity of the upcoming allergy seasons. Rain can  decrease and increase various pollen counts. While we may experience initial relief from rain’s ability to reduce tree pollen counts, it may also spur the growth of grass pollen later in the spring,as well as mold allergies.


Allergy sufferers can follow local pollen counts to gauge pollen fluctuations. Symptoms may be lower on days that are rainy, cloudy, or windless because pollen does not move or has limited movement during these conditions. Likewise, hot, dry, and windy weather signals more significant pollen and mold distribution and may cause greater allergy symptoms. Allergic reactions can range from simple sneezing to more severe reactions. Allergies can also cause skin irritations and breathing problems or asthma. Over time, the symptoms can also cause fatigue, insomnia, and problems with concentration and work performance. They can also increase the risk of ear infections and sinusitis. For people with other allergies, including foods, seasonal allergens can add to the allergic burden and aggravate other allergic conditions.


The first step toward treating allergies is a physical exam, review of medical history, and testing to identify specific allergens and the level of sensitivity in order to develop a custom treatment based on the patient’s unique allergic fingerprint. Year-round immunotherapy is often recommended if symptoms continue or last throughout the year. Memorial Institute of Health & Healing offers sublingual immunotherapy year-round to treat a variety of allergens as well as preseasonal therapy for those with limited seasonal allergies. This treatment helps the immune system learn to tolerate an individual’s specific allergies and lessens the symptoms and the need for future medications. The drops can be taken at home by the patient, eliminating the need for frequent office visits for treatment. Allergy drops also enable a broader range of patients with a wider range of allergies to be treated, including common seasonal allergies, as well as year-round
offenders like pet dander, dust, and mold. Because of the excellent safety profile of allergy drops, young children, asthmatics, highly sensitive patients, and those with other related chronic conditions can be treated.
For more information about allergy treatment options or appointments, contact Memorial
Institute of Health & Healing at 217-357-6815.
#####

 

Sheriff Travis Duffy reports that an investigation into thefts in the rural La Harpe, IL area has led to an arrest and the execution of a search warrant.

Sheriff Travis Duffy reports that an investigation into thefts in the rural La Harpe,
IL area has led to an arrest and the execution of a search warrant.

Sheriff’s Deputies have been investigating numerous thefts in the La Harpe, IL
area. Those include reports of stolen tools, trailers, equipment, machinery, and
other items.
A cooperative effort with the Henderson County Sheriff’s Office led to the
recovery of a stolen trailer near Gladstone, IL. The trailer had been stolen from
rural La Harpe, IL.
An arrest warrant was sought for William D. Miller (42, La Harpe, IL) for
Felony Theft. Deputies also learned through the investigation that Miller was
alleged to be in possession of stolen items at his residence, 101 N. B Street, La
Harpe, IL. A search warrant for those premises was sought and granted by the
court.
On April 1, 2024, at approximately 4:35 PM the search warrant for 101 N. B Street
was executed.
William D. Miller was located and placed under arrest for the above-mentioned
warrant.
Numerous items were recovered during the search and collected as evidence. This
investigation is ongoing and further charges are expected to be filed.
All persons who are arrested are presumed innocent until proven guilty in a court
of law.

Sheriff Travis Duffy reports the following information regarding theft investigations in the rural LaHarpe, IL area.

Sheriff Travis Duffy reports the following information regarding theft
investigations in the rural LaHarpe, IL area.

On March 15, 2024 at approximately 3:40 PM the Sheriff’s Office received a
report of a stolen trailer. Deputies investigated the theft which led to an arrest.
Jordan L. Ragain (29, LaHarpe, IL) was arrested for Possession of Stolen Property.
Further investigation into this theft and other thefts in the area led deputies to apply
for a search warrant.
The search warrant was executed on March 30, 2024. Several stolen items were
recovered from the property.
The investigation is ongoing and further charges are expected to be filed.
All persons whom are arrested are to be presumed innocent util proven guilty in a
court of law.

Sheriff Duffy reports the following drug related arrests in the month of March 2024 and late February 2024

Sheriff Duffy reports the following drug related arrests in the month of March 2024 and late February 2024

On February 28, 2024, at approximately 11:30 PM a deputy on patrol conducted a
traffic stop on a silver 2001 Chevrolet coupe on the New Warsaw Road at Windy
Hills Rd. A passenger, Taylor D. Harrison (20, Carthage, IL) was found to be in
possession of a small amount of methamphetamine and a used glass smoking pipe.
Harrison was subsequently arrested and charged with Possession of
Methamphetamine.
On March 1, 2024, at approximately 8:00 PM a deputy on patrol conducted a
traffic stop on a 1997 tan Mitsubishi SUV on US 136 near County Road 1450E.
The traffic stop led to a Driving While Under the Influence investigation. The
driver, Marcus D. Gilpin (40, Hamilton, IL) was subsequently arrested and
charged with Driving Under the Influence of Drugs.
On March 17, 2024, at approximately 5:00 PM a deputy on patrol made an arrest
for a Hancock County Warrant. Brent W. Tripp (38, Warsaw, IL) was placed
under arrest on a warrant for failing to appear in court. A search of Tripp’s person
and personal effects on his person revealed a small amount of methamphetamine
and a used glass smoking pipe. Tripp was subsequently charged with Possession of
Methamphetamine.
On March 17, 2024, at approximately 11:45 PM a deputy on patrol conducted a
traffic stop on a blue 2002 Buick Le Sabre on US 136 near County Road 1100E.
A Sheriff’s Office K9 was called to the scene. The K9 alerted on the vehicle, and it
was then searched, Deputies discovered a small amount of methamphetamine in
the vehicle. The driver, Sheri L. Taylor (58, Keokuk, IA) was placed under arrest
and charged with Possession of Methamphetamine.
All persons who are arrested are presumed innocent until proven guilty in a court
of law.

MEMORIAL HOSPITAL FOUNDATION LAUNCHES CAMPAIGN TO FUND MEMORIAL MEDICAL CLINIC MOBILE UNIT

 

MEMORIAL HOSPITAL FOUNDATION LAUNCHES CAMPAIGN TO FUND

MEMORIAL MEDICAL CLINIC MOBILE UNIT

- Memorial Hospital Foundation has launched a new fundraising effort
to provide local students with essential mental health resources. Memorial Hospital Foundation's Strengthening Minds, Building Futures campaign will support Memorial Hospital's Behavioral Health - Memorial Hospital Foundation has launched a new fundraising effort
to provide local students with essential mental health resources. Memorial Hospital Foundation's
Strengthening Minds, Building Futures campaign will support Memorial Hospital's Behavioral Health
team, as they work to open a new mobile unit: Memorial Medical Clinic Mobile.


This mobile clinic will allow mental health counselors to provide students with needed support, therapy, and resources, directly on their schoo's campus. This mobile unit is licensed to serve children ages 4 through 18 throughout Hancock County and beyond. This added service will allow the team to address common challenges such as anxiety, depression, social/emotional difficulties, ADHD, emotional dysregulation, and much more. The team will also be licensed to assist schools with Individualized Education Program (IEP) education. In the future, the counselors plan to offer Autism screenings at the mobile clinic.


Memorial Hospital Foundation's monetary goal to launch this unit is $30,000. Donations to the Strengthening Minds, Building Futures campaign will be used to directly fund and renovate the transportation unit that will become Memorial Medical Clinic Mobile. Memoria's Behavioral Health team hopes to begin serving children in Fall 2024.


Contributions to the Strengthening Minds, Building Futures campaign can be mailed to Memorial Hospital Foundation at P.O. Box 160, Carthage, IL, 62321. For more information, please contact Greta Wetzel, Memorial Hospital Foundation Executive Director, at gwetzel@mhtlc.org or (309) 221-7286.
 

2024 Eclipse

Encase you missed it

View of the April 8th Eclipse  in From Carbondale

Taken by M Taylor

Memorial Hospital Generates $103.9 Million Annual Economic Impact, Employs 241 People and Generates 325 Additional Jobs for the Community

Memorial Hospital Generates $103.9 Million Annual Economic Impact,
Employs 241 People and Generates 325 Additional Jobs for the Community

 

Carthage, IL – Memorial Hospital is a key contributor to Illinois’ economic growth by creating good-paying jobs supporting working families while promoting community health and well- being. According to a new report, Memorial Hospital provides 566 direct and indirect jobs for the community, generating a total annual impact of $103.9 million on the local and state economy.


The report on Memorial Hospital’s economic impact was developed in conjunction with the Illinois Health and Hospital Association (IHA), whose statewide economic impact report underscores the important role of Illinois hospitals as powerful economic drivers.


“Memorial Hospital is dedicated to our community. We provide lifesaving care and healthcare services that enhance individual and community health and well-being,” said Ada Bair, CEO of Memorial Hospital and Hancock County Senior and Childcare Services. “We are also proud of  our role in strengthening the local economy and supporting families with good-paying jobs.”

 Among the report’s key findings:
? Memorial Hospital employs 241 people directly, expending $24,415,592 a year on direct
payroll, and creates 325 indirect jobs with $33,180,790 in indirect payroll.

 
? Memorial Hospital spends $40,605,059 on supplies/services and $5,706,525
capital—both direct and indirect—for a total of $46,311,584 combined.


? Memorial Hospital has a total annual economic impact of $103.9 million.
IHA’s statewide economic impact report highlights the following:
? Hospitals pump $117.7 billion into the state economy; 
? One in 10 Illinois jobs is in healthcare;
? For every Illinois hospital job, another 1.4 jobs are created in other sectors; and
? Hospitals employ 190,000 Illinoisans in good-paying jobs.


“As strong community anchors, Illinois hospitals and health systems generate a tremendous amount of economic activity. They are major employers who provide good-paying jobs and large buyers of supplies and services,” said IHA President and CEO A.J. Wilhelmi. “Their impact on the economy comes in addition to the work of providing essential healthcare services, enhancing individual and community health and well-being, and addressing health disparities so  all individuals can achieve optimal health.”


Estimates of the Illinois hospitals’ economic benefits were based on the Regional Input-Output Modeling System II (RIMS-II) developed by the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA). The Final Demand multipliers, obtained from BEA RIMS-II, were applied to 2022/2023 Medicare cost report data of hospital jobs and spending to obtain the “ripple” effect of jobs and spending throughout the economy.

#####
About Memorial Hospital

Memorial Hospital is committed to delivering outstanding healthcare. Memorial Hospital is a 501(c)(3), nonprofit critical access hospital, which employs over 300 individuals, offers emergency, surgical, imaging (x-ray), laboratory, seven clinics throughout
the region, specialty clinics, and more. Memorial Hospital has served the residents of Hancock County and surrounding areas since 1950. For more information, find us on the web at www.mhtlc.org

Drive-Thru Interviews Happening Tuesday at Chaddock

Drive-Thru Interviews Happening Tuesday at Chaddock

 

– An exciting opportunity for anyone in the market for employment! Chaddock is hosting a Drive- Thru Interview Event on Tuesday, April 9th from 11:00-1:00 p.m. in the parking lot of the main campus at 205 S. 24th St. Quincy, Illinois. Entry-level, daytime, nighttime and degree opportunities are available.
60% of applicants were hired from Chaddock’s last drive-thru event! Media coverage is welcome and appreciated at the event.
Applicants will interview on the spot without ever having to leave their vehicle! Lunch will be provided to every applicant, as well as the opportunity to ask questions about working for Chaddock.
Current openings include Youth Workers, Youth Counselors, Nursing and Special Education Teachers.  Resumés are preferred.
Applicants can follow the signs to the parking lot where they will be greeted by a member of the Human Resources team and guided through a brief interview. For more details regarding Drive-Thru Interviews, visit to chaddock.org/careers or visit the Chaddock Facebook page.
Located in Quincy, IL, Chaddock is an internationally recognized leader in the treatment of children suffering from the psychological, emotional, and spiritual effects of significant abuse, neglect and trauma. Chaddock’s full range of preventative, educational and treatment services to children from birth to age 21 and their families include community-based services, a special education school, in-home intensive programs and residential treatment. Through The Knowledge Center at Chaddock, our on-campus professionals have the ability to share decades of direct care expertise with professionals and families
across the country and throughout the world. For more information, visit chaddock.org or call (217) 222 – 0034.

Bill ending state's tipped wage advances but prospects uncertain amid pushback

Bill ending state’s tipped wage advances but prospects uncertain amid pushback

Opponents say eliminating the tip credit will lead to decreased hours and layoffs for staff 

SPRINGFIELD – An Illinois House committee advanced a measure that would end the state’s subminimum wage for tipped workers amid bipartisan opposition this week, but the bill’s sponsor said she’d seek further compromise before presenting it for a vote. 

Current Illinois law allows employers to pay their tipped workers 60 percent of the state’s minimum wage. That amounts to $8.40 hourly, compared to the minimum wage of $14 per hour. If their wages plus tips do not equal minimum wage, the employer must make up the difference. However, advocates say, employers don’t always do that.

House Bill 5345, sponsored by Rep. Elizabeth “Lisa” Hernandez, D-Cicero, would mandate that tipped workers are paid at least minimum wage, not including tips. She said the bill will eliminate “subminimum wage, not tips.” 

Hernandez made her comments during a lengthy hearing Wednesday in a packed committee room filled with advocates on both sides of the issue. She ultimately promised to not bring the bill to a vote in the full House without first negotiating amendments on it, but she also noted one of those changes would better address inequity within the industry and add punitive measures against “bad actors.”

Proponents of the bill said that not all employers follow the law and dependency on tips perpetuates inequalities. A 2014 report from the Economic Policy Institute think tank found at that time 66 percent of tipped workers were women and the poverty rate of tipped workers was almost double that of nontipped workers.

“Depending on tips to make a basic living wage is a system that exposes workers to poverty, to inequity and to harassment,” Rep. Will Guzzardi, D-Chicago, said at the committee hearing Wednesday.

While the bill is intended to increase wages for tipped workers and address inequities within the industry, much of the roughly two-hour debate in the committee hearing focused on how the proposal will impact businesses and employees.

At a Capitol news conference earlier Wednesday, a coalition of tipped workers and representatives of the state’s restaurant and retail trade associations shared concerns about the proposal. They claimed the change would drive up prices at restaurants specifically.  

Illinois Restaurant Association President Sam Toia said increasing the cost of labor will lead to owners reducing staff and increasing prices. Toia said many businesses are still recovering from the recession brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic.

“A business that used to be a business of nickels and dimes is now a business of pennies and nickels,” he said. “The proposal would only increase that stress on operators.”

Dominique Juarez, a server at Alexander’s Steakhouse in Peoria, said at the news conference she opposes the elimination of tip credit and that the bill “corners us into a no-win situation.” 

She said that eliminating tip credit could lead to higher menu prices, which would in turn impact her relationship with regular customers, which she described as “the heart of what dining is all about.”

Currently, seven states — Alaska, California, Minnesota, Montana, Nevada, Oregon and Washington, along with Washington D.C. — have laws in place to guarantee tipped workers make minimum wage.

Chicago enacted similar legislation in October, which phases out the city’s tip credit over five years, culminating with tipped employees receiving minimum wage in 2028. 

“Chicago's passed this,” Rob Karr, president of the Illinois Retail Merchants Association, said Wednesday. “We should wait and see how it plays out over the next five years before rushing into a similar proposal statewide.”

While the measure passed on a 17-11 vote, one of the committee’s 19 Democrats, Rep. Jawaharial Williams of Chicago, voted against it. Rep. Marty Moylan, D-Des Plaines, was recorded as not voting. Democrats, who control the General Assembly, subbed out seven members on the Labor and Commerce Committee before the vote.

Other Democrats spoke out against the measure at the Wednesday news conference. 

That included Rep. Curtis Tarver, D-Chicago, who said the idea that tipped employees don’t make minimum wage is false, and warned the proposal would have adverse effects.

“This is more legislation chasing a solution to a problem that does not exist,” he said. “Eliminating tip credit is going to hurt the very people that this legislation purports to help.”

Tarver also said that while there may be some “bad actors” who aren’t paying their employees minimum wage, the current law should be enforced rather than eliminating the tip credit.

The One Fair Wage advocacy group, which has for years been pushing for an end to the tipped wage, celebrated the committee vote as a “historic step towards justice.”

“A direct legacy of slavery, the subminimum wage for decades has been used as a tool to force service industry workers, particularly women and people of color, to live in poverty,” Saru Jayaraman, president of One Fair Wage, said in a news release. 

 

Capitol News Illinois is a nonprofit, nonpartisan news service covering state government. It is distributed to hundreds of newspapers, radio and TV stations statewide. It is funded primarily by the Illinois Press Foundation and the Robert R. McCormick Foundation, along with major contributions from the Illinois Broadcasters Foundation and Southern Illinois Editorial Association.

Court upholds law limiting where child sex offenders can live

Court upholds law limiting where child sex offenders can live

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois Supreme Court has ruled that a state law restricting where previously convicted child sex offenders can live is constitutional, although it left open the possibility that it was improperly applied to one individual.

In a 6-0 decision, the court found the residency restriction “does not infringe upon a child sex offender’s fundamental rights” and that there was a “rational basis” for the state to restrict where a person convicted of such a crime can live.

“The legislature has a legitimate interest in protecting children from neighboring child sex offenders and sexual predators,” the court said in an opinion written by Justice David Overstreet. “The Residency Restriction bears a reasonable relationship to furthering the State’s public interest in protecting children by creating a buffer between a child day care home and the home of a child sex offender to protect children from the harm for which child sex offenders have been convicted.”

The case involved Martin Kopf, a Kane County resident, now in his 50s, who was convicted in 2003 of aggravated criminal sexual abuse for an incident involving a 15-year-old boy. According to a published report of the incident, Kopf was a high school basketball coach at the time and sexually abused a member of his team during a sleepover at which he allegedly served the boy alcohol.

Kopf served three years’ probation and reportedly has not reoffended since that incident. But he is permanently required to register as a sex offender, which, among other things, entails legal restrictions on where he is allowed to live.

In 2018, Kopf and his wife bought a home in the village of Hampshire, in Kane County. But before doing so, they checked with both the Illinois State Police and the Hampshire Police Department to make sure it complied with his residency restrictions. Records indicate both agencies told him that it did.

Three months after moving in, however, they were told a day care facility was located within 500 feet of their home – a violation of the state’s residency restrictions – and, as a result, they would have to move.

Kopf, who represented himself in court proceedings, challenged the law as unconstitutional, and in 2021, Kane County Circuit Judge Kevin Busch agreed. Busch wrote the law was both unconstitutional “on its face,” meaning it would violate constitutional rights under any circumstances, and “as applied” to Kopf.

But in an opinion released March 21, the Illinois high court disagreed, overturning Busch’s ruling that the law was facially unconstitutional, and saying there was no factual evidence in the record to support a finding that it was unconstitutional “as applied” in Kopf’s case.

The court therefore sent the case back to Kane County for the sole purpose of determining whether there was evidence to find the law unconstitutional “as applied” to Kopf.

Courts generally use one of two standards in deciding whether a law is constitutional. In cases involving a “fundamental right,” the standard of “strict scrutiny” applies, meaning the government has to show the law serves a compelling state interest and that it is narrowly tailored to achieve that interest.

But in cases involving rights that are less than fundamental, courts use a “rational basis test,” meaning the government only has to show a rational connection between the law’s means and its goals.

Citing language first coined by U.S. Supreme Court Justice Benjamin Cardozo in a famous 1937 opinion, the state’s high court said the right to live where one pleases is not “fundamental” because it “is not ‘deeply rooted in this Nation’s history and tradition’ or ‘implicit in the concept of ordered liberty’ such that ‘neither liberty nor justice would exist if [it] were sacrificed.’”

Therefore, the court said, the state only needed to show a rational basis for residency restrictions.

Kane County Judge Busch said the restrictions failed the rational basis test, citing studies that have shown there is little or no evidence to suggest such restrictions reduce the chance of someone reoffending.

But in its March 21 ruling, the Supreme Court reversed that decision, saying such studies don’t matter because the legislature’s judgment in drafting a statute “may be based on rational speculation unsupported by evidence or empirical data and are not subject to judicial factfinding.”

 

Capitol News Illinois is a nonprofit, nonpartisan news service covering state government. It is distributed to hundreds of newspapers, radio and TV stations statewide. It is funded primarily by the Illinois Press Foundation and the Robert R. McCormick Foundation, along with major contributions from the Illinois Broadcasters Foundation and Southern Illinois Editorial Association.

Lawmakers question Pritzker's plan for new early childhood agency

Lawmakers question Pritzker’s plan for Lawmakers question Pritzker’s plan for new early childhood agencynew early childhood agency

 

SPRINGFIELD – Gov. JB Pritzker’s plan to consolidate the state’s early childhood programs into one new cabinet-level agency ran into tough questions this week during a House budget committee hearing.

The plan, which Pritzker first announced in October and which he included in his budget address in February, would consolidate a host of programs and services currently run by three different agencies under one roof. 

That would include such things as child care subsidies for low-income families currently housed in the Department of Human Services; preschool block grants administered by the State Board of Education; and the licensing of day care centers, which is currently done by the Department of Children and Family Services.

Pritzker is seeking $13.1 million in the budget for the upcoming fiscal year to establish a new Department of Early Childhood. But that would only cover some initial start-up costs, such as hiring executive staff, buying new computers and software licenses.

It would also include the cost of surveying parents, teachers, service providers and other stakeholders about what they want from a new agency and how they would like to see it operate.

Ann Whalen, the person Pritzker named in October to oversee the transition, told committee members Tuesday the administration expects it will be two full years before the new agency will be ready to take over any of the programs being transferred to it.

“We really do see this as a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to make the system easier, fairer and more cohesive,” she said. “We believe that the budget request reflects the capacity we need to do this work.”

Most Democrats on the committee seemed receptive to the idea of putting all early childhood programs under one roof.

“Conceptually, I support this,” said Rep. Sue Scherer, D-Decatur. “I can see where early childhood is sort of spread all over the board.”

But Scherer said she was concerned about whether the creation of a new agency would result in an overall net increase in administrative costs for the state and, if so, where that additional money would come from.

“At the end of the day, it all comes out of tax revenue from taxpayers,” she said. “So every dollar we spend on this – and I just need everyone to be aware of this – is a dollar we don't have to spend, potentially, on students, and teacher salaries, because it's money that we're spending for administration and location of a new agency, basically.”

Whalen said much of the money the new agency would spend will be federal dollars that currently flow to other agencies. On multiple occasions, though, she declined to speculate about what the net cost would be to the state and whether the overall administrative costs – including new office spaces – would be more or less than what the state is spending now.

“I don't want to put out a number that gets in front of the process,” she said. “I don't want to say we're going to have this exact org chart, or this exact look at programs and services, because I don't want to jump to conclusions about what parents and providers say they want out of the system.”

Republicans on the panel were more skeptical about the proposal. 

“Why shouldn't we be extremely concerned that we are statutorily creating an entire government agency when you're telling us right now that we really don't have any idea what it's going to cost?” asked Rep. Blaine Wilhour, of Beecher City, the Republican spokesperson on the panel. “Wouldn't it be more prudent to go through this two-year study phase and not create an entire government agency that we have no idea what it's going to cost?”

But Whalen said the idea of forming a single agency for early childhood services grew out of years of study and planning in Illinois, as well as the experience of other states.

“We firmly believe that it's important to begin the process of standing up this new agency, because when we have spoken to other states, they have said, ‘we tried to do it all at once,’ or ‘we did not take enough time to listen,’ or ‘we did not stand up a new agency and have the opportunity to plan before we transition the programs over, and boy do we wish we had done that differently,’” she said.

The committee took no action on the budget request. That will be part of a final spending package that lawmakers will negotiate at the end of the spring session, which is scheduled to last through the month of May.

The legislation to create a new agency is contained in two bills – Senate Bill 1 and House Bill 5451 – both of which are still pending in their respective chambers.

 

Capitol News Illinois is a nonprofit, nonpartisan news service covering state government. It is distributed to hundreds of newspapers, radio and TV stations statewide. It is funded primarily by the Illinois Press Foundation and the Robert R. McCormick Foundation, along with major contributions from the Illinois Broadcasters Foundation and Southern Illinois Editorial Association.

Warsaw Wellness Event hosted by Memorial Hospital

Memorial Hospital and Warsaw Chamber of Commerce Partner to

Host Warsaw Wellness Expo

IL—Memorial Hospital is excited to partner with the Warsaw Chamber of Commerce
to host the Warsaw Wellness Expo at the Bott Community Center on Saturday, April 20, 2024, from 9:00 AM to 12:00 PM. Memorial Hospital and the Warsaw Chamber of Commerce invite the Warsaw community to participate in an immersive experience with an array of engaging activities for kids, informative workshops, and essential health screening.


Offerings include A1C, Blood Pressure screenings, face painting, a cooking demo for kids, a teddy bear clinic, and prize drawings. There will also be a kids' wellness expo with breakout sessions. Light refreshments from Memorial Hospital's chef, Amber Clark, will also be provided for all attendees. Additionally, several Warsaw Chamber businesses will be set up and participating in the wellness expo.


Memorial Hospital is urging the Warsaw community to take part in a survey concerning health services. The hospital aims to understand the specific health services desired by the local  communi y and hopes to enhance accessibility to those services accordingly. There will be prize drawings as well, and multiple prizes will be given away. To be entered into a special prize drawing, please bring the direct mail postcard with you to the event.


This event aims to promote holistic well-being and encourage healthy lifestyle choices.
Prioritizing wellness has never been more crucial. Memorial Hospital aims to empower
individuals with the knowledge and resources they need to lead healthier, happier lives.
Don't miss out on this opportunity to collaborate with us! The Warsaw Bott Community Center is conveniently located at 705 Lafayette Street, Warsaw, Illinois. We look forward to welcoming your family and loved ones.

A Memorial Concert will be held in memory of Lin Waller from Augusta, Illinois- April 6th

A Memorial Concert will be held in memory of Lin Waller from Augusta, Illinois- April 6th

Lin Waller from Augusta passed away suddendly April 10th 2023 

Lin's favorite Gospel Group was Karen Peck and New River from Dahlonega, Georgia.  This group is known all over the world for their great success.  They have had over 20 #1 hit songs and received countless awards.  Karen Peck is a Southern Gospel Music Hall of Fame member and voted favorite Soprano by the Singing News Fan Awards.  They are the Best of the Best.

Also, a Special Guest Singer will be Joe Arview from Benton, Illinois.  His country style of music is loved by all.

This Lin Waller Concert will be Saturday, April 6th, 2024 at the Macomb Assembly of God Church in Macomb, Illinois. The concert will begin at 6:30 p.m., admission will be a $12.00 donation, kids under 12 years of age are FREE. The church is located at 112 Robin Road in Macomb, Illinois.  For more information call 217-440-0280.  Concert is sponsored by Augusta Assembly of God Pastors Jerry and Patsy Spratt.  Come and be Blessed!

 

 

 

Counterfeit $100 Bills found in Carthage

Counterfeit $100 Bills found in Carthage 

Counterfeit $100 Bills found in Carthage  were found in Carthage in a alley these bills  say COPY on the front and back and are on real paper, feel fake, all of the serial numbers are the same.

The Carthage Police Department has been notified. 

Appanoose Faith Church - Annual Chicken Fry Saturday April 6th

Appanoose Faith Church - Annual Chicken Fry  Saturday April 6th

Appanoose Faith Church

1176 ECR 2700

Niota, IL  62358

 

Annual Chicken Fry

4:30pm-7pm

Dine in and Carry Out Available

Free Will Donation

Menu:

Chicken by Dallas City Fryers

Corn

Cheesy Potatoes

Pasta Salads

Deviled Eggs

Rolls

Desserts

 

 

 Proceeds towards Building Repairs

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WCAZ Milestones

What is your milestone?

 

Is it a Birthday, Anniversary, Birth of a Child, Graduation or maybe a Promotion?

 

We want to know! Let us help you celebrate by airing it on the NEW WCAZ! To hear your milestone, tune in weekday mornings at 7:30 am.  

 

Send your information by:

 

Phone:           (217) 357-6056 

or

Email:            info@wcazradio.com

or

Mail:              WCAZ Radio

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                       Carthage, Il 62321

Let us help you celebrate!