Office Phone: 217-357-6056

WCAZ Radio News Archives for 2023-07

Cooling Centers in Hancock County

COOLING CENTERS IN HANCOCK COUNTY ILLINOIS

CARTHAGE-    Carthage Community Center on 301  Main st     8 am - 5 pm

VFW-  today till Monday from 11 am till midnight Friday and Saturday till 1 am. Come get some water and cool off.

HAMILTON- Community center in Hamilton will be available as a cooling center 9am to 5pm.

 WARSAW- Bott Center   It is usually unlocked between 7:00 AM and 7:30 PM

Nauvoo-  Nauvoo City Hall     8 am - 4 pm  

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

The 2023 Adams County Fair kicked off Wednesday, July 26 and runs through August 1 at the fairgrounds near Mendon. This year's fair marks the 81st year of this family-friendly tradition in the Tri-States. The jam-packed schedule could keep a family busy

The 2023 Adams County Fair kicked off Wednesday, July 26 and runs through August 1 at the fairgrounds near Mendon. This year’s fair marks the 81st year of this family-friendly tradition in the Tri-States.  The jam-packed schedule could keep a family busy for all 7 days, but here are a few highlights you won’t want to miss.  

1) Concert featuring Tracy Byrd with special guest Jo Dee Messina (Saturday, July 29th)

    This concert is going to be a BLAST. Tracy Byrd has a long line of number one hits from “Lifestyles of the Not So Rich and Famous” to "Watermelon Crawl.” One popular ballad, “The Keeper of the Star's" was the Academy of Country Music's "Song of the Year" in 1995. 

    A lot of excitement surrounds the appearance of special guest Jo Dee Messina.  She kicked off her notable career with “Heads Carolina, Tails California,” a single that immediately made her a household name. Following the success of her debut, Jo Dee posted nine No. 1 hits and sixteen Top 40 songs and was honored by the ACM Awards, CMA Awards, and GRAMMY Awards. 

From the feedback received from the Adams County Fair staff, Jo Dee Messina has a BIG following in the Tri-States and beyond.

Just recently she had a cameo in Cole Swindell’s music video ‘She had Me at Heads Carolina,” which also features her BIG hit ‘Heads Carolina, Tails California.’ 

    The concert sponsored by Gem City Ford Lincoln is set to begin at 7p.m. Saturday, July 29th. Tickets to enter the fair that evening are $15 starting at 4p.m.  (Check out their “Deals” page on the website to learn how to save money.) Tickets to get on the track are also available for an additional $15 at Farm and Home Supply in Quincy or at the Adams County Fair Office.  

2) Bronc and Bull Riding Action

    The Adams County Fair always brings in a couple great nights of rodeo type action.  Thursday, July 27 Quincy Mack is brining in some rough and rowdy broncos to the grandstand arena. They’ve offered up a mighty large winners’ purse to attract cowboys from across the nation to compete.  The bull riding night is Friday, July 28 , with the guys at Little Jess Chrysler, Dodge Jeep and Ram hauling in some crazy bulls for competition.  These two nights will keep you on the edge of your seat literally. The grandstand action is always free with entry into the fair, so there’s a lot of excitement to enjoy for $10 bucks a night.

3) Demolition Derby  

    The Adams County Fair is always a destination location for area demo enthusiasts. Demolition Derby cars and drivers come in by the droves for big trophies and a chance to wow the big crowds.  Your crew of kids and adults alike will enjoy the crashing and bashing - making some memories for years to come.  This year’s demo derby is Tuesday, August 1, sponsored by Quincy Medical Group.  Admission to the fair that night is $10 for adults and kids older than 12 years of age.  

4) Economical for families

    One thing that separates the Adams County Fair from most local county fairs is the cost.  The Adams County Fair Board has made it a priority since the beginning to make a visit to the fair something everyone can afford.  Admission is $10/person at the gate. However, kids 12 and under are always FREE.  Plus all grandstand events are FREE to enter with the price of admission. The extra daily circus entertainment, horse shows, petting zoo and kids activities are FREE as well.  You’ll probably want to bring some cash for your fair food favorites or rides, but of course that’s up to each person and family.  (The fair website has a “Deals” page where they let you know of locations and times where there are free food options!)  If you’d like to make it to the fair every night a season pass or exhibitors pass makes the fair makes fair entry even cheaper.  The fair board hasn’t raised their admission prices along with the rest of the world — so enjoy!!!

5) Tractor Pulls—

    It wouldn’t be a county fair without the promise of big engines.  The Adams County Fair is known for its big pulls, and it’s become so popular with regional pullers that the fair has TWO nights of tractor pulls. This year check it out on Sunday, July 30 and Monday, July 31.  The first night of pulls is sponsored by Sullivan Auctioneers and brings in pullers from the UPA and Xcalibur pulling organizations. Monday, July 31st expect big action from the pullers from the ITPA (Illinois Tractor Pullers Association), sponsored by Poage Auto.  

6) Horse Shows

    Did you know the Adams County Fair is second in the entire state of Illinois when it comes to horse shows? There is always something going on in the Horse Arena and all the shows attract riders from all over the region. If you have a horse-crazy kid, the Adams County Fair is the place to check out equine of all sizes and abilities— and their riders are pretty cool too! 

7)  Family Fun Zone

    The Adams County Fair Board created the Family Fun Zone about a decade ago with the idea of giving families a place to relax and enjoy FREE activities together.  There is a free petting zoo, a corn pit to play in and free shows daily.  This year the fair is hauling in the Cincinnati Circus to entertain kids and families with jaw dropping action. It’s also the site of the FREE Kids’ Games on Kids’ Day on Tuesday, August 1st.  Kids compete in contests ranging from hot dog eating to bubble gum blowing.  It’s not only entertaining to watch, but it means free food for the kids!

8) Pageants

    It wouldn’t be a county fair without the Fair Queen!  At the Adams County Fair we have a whole royal family.  The fair kicks off with the crowning of the Miss Adams County Fair Queen pageant on Wednesday, July 26. However, this pageant night sponsored by Prairieland FS, also features the Little Mister and Mis Pageant as well as Sweetheart of Adams County Pageants.  The Sweetheart of Adams County Pageant is very special to the fair board.  It honors boys, girls, as well as men and women with developmental disabilities a chance to experience a crowning moment on stage as we celebrate their abilities. It’s definitely a time of celebration and you will find yourself glad you found this moment to cherish during the Adams County Fair.

9) New traditions mixed in with the old

    The Adams County Fair can trace its roots back more than one hundred years.  However it’s been an annual event for 81 years.  With its long history, the fair loves to tip its hat to tradition.  While on the grounds, visitors can get a mini history lesson by checking out the “Olde Time Exhibits.” There are threshing demonstrations, chair caning, blacksmithing and spinning to name a few. Plus all the antique tractors take center stage on Saturday and Sunday at 2:30p.m. during the “Olde Time Parade.”  It’s a bit of Americana in the midst of the modern country artists and big tractor pull action.  

10) Animals, Animals Animals

    Although the Adams County Fair is known for some awesome concerts and events, agriculture is at the root of its creation. This massive complex began more than a hundred years ago when local farmers got together to see which team of horses could pull the most weight on a cart. Competitions were added for the ladies, who brought all their baked goods, jams and jellies to be judged. Exhibitions like these still happen at the Adams County Fair (and offer reduced priced season passes). However, the most focus is on animal shows, in which families and 4-Hers show off their best in a show ring. These folks take great pride in the care of their animals. If you’ve got an animal crazy kid— it’s the best place for kids to ask questions about animals and what it takes to care for their furry and feathered friends. 

That’s just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to all the family favorites at the Adams County Fair. The full schedule will surprise you.  It’s massive, which goes to show there’s always something to do or see at the Adams County Fair.  

Check out the full schedule and plan your adventure at www.adamsfair.org.

It’s also important to follow the Adams County Fair on Social Media.  That’s where you get the latest updates on everything fair.

Be sure to post your experience and tag the Adams County Fair.  Have an AWESOME TIME at the Adams County Fair!

 

MEMORIAL HOSPITAL FOUNDATION & HANCOCK VILLAGE TO HOST FOUR SEASON ROOM OPEN HOUSE

MEMORIAL HOSPITAL FOUNDATION & HANCOCK VILLAGE
TO HOST FOUR SEASON ROOM OPEN HOUSE

Memorial Hospital Foundation and Hancock Village Senior Living Campus in Carthage, Illinois are thrilled to host an upcoming open house to showcase the new four season room living space located on Hickory Grove’s campus. The construction of this room was made possible by those who generously contributed to Memorial Hospital Foundation’s You are my Sunshine Campaign, which raised over $150,000 to support this project. The completed space is now utilized and enjoyed by all residents across Hancock Village’s campus.
The public is invited and encouraged to tour this new state-of-the-art space by attending the upcoming open house on Saturday, August 26 th from 1:00 PM until 3:00 PM at 404 South Adams Street in Carthage. Light refreshments will be provided. All are welcome! Questions regarding this event may be directed to Memorial Hospital Foundation’s Director of Development, Colleen Wildrick, by emailing cwildrick@mhtlc.org or calling (217) 357-5445.

Memorial Hospital Awarded for Excellence in Stroke Care

Memorial Hospital recently received two awards from
the American Heart Association as a stroke-designated hospital

 

Memorial Hospital recently received two awards from the American Heart Association as a stroke-designated hospital. Memorial Hospital received the Silver Plus award for quality stroke care for overall hospitals as well as Rural Stroke Bronze which recognizes rural hospitals. These awards are given to hospitals nationwide that report their measures to the American Heart Association. The American Heart Association acknowledges
Memorial for its continued success in using the Get With the Guidelines program by applying the most up-to-date evidence-based treatment guidelines to improve patient care and outcomes in the community.


Memorial Hospital is a certified Emergent Stroke Ready Hospital by the Illinois
Department of Public Health. Earning the certification requires Memorial Hospital to meet the standard to support better outcomes by providing early intervention to stroke patients. The eligibility standards include a dedicated stroke-focused program, qualified medical professionals trained in stroke care, and individualized care to meet stroke patients’ needs.

 

 As an Emergent Stroke Ready Hospital, Memorial Hospital is certified, trained, and
ready to provide quality care to stroke patients. Having an Emergent Stroke Ready Hospital plays a key role in the community by providing essential healthcare services to stroke patients. Strokes are a medical emergency that requires immediate attention and specialized care. Having  an Emergent Stroke Ready Hospital means that residents within the surrounding communities have access to critical medical support in times of crisis, potentially saving lives and reducing the long-term effects of strokes on patients. Furthermore, an Emergent Stroke Ready Hospital fosters a sense of security and reassurance within the community. This proactive approach can lead to
better outcomes and recovery rates for stroke patients.

Hancock County Receives Confirmation of Mosquito Batches Testing Positive for West Nile Virus

Hancock County Receives Confirmation of Mosquito Batches

Testing Positive for West Nile Virus

 

The Hancock County Health Department has been notified that mosquito batches sent in from Hancock County have tested positive for the West Nile Virus.  Monitoring mosquito and bird populations help predict when and where humans will be most at risk for West Nile virus infections, as well as, where and when additional precautions and control measures should be taken.  Furthermore, no human cases of West Nile Virus have been reported in Hancock County.

If a dead bird such as, Crow, Blue Jay, Grackle, Starling, Robin, Cardinal, Sparrow, Finch, Hawk and Owl is found in Hancock County and is in good condition and shows no signs it died from causes other than disease, please contact the Hancock County Health Department at 217-357-2171 option 5.  If the bird meets the criteria the bird will be sent to the lab for west nile testing.  The bird should have no injuries, no signs of advanced decomposition (maggots, strong odor, dried or deflated eyes).  If the bird is found after hours or on the weekend, plastic/latex gloves or bags can be used to pick up the bird and placed in a few layers of paper towels, double bagged and placed in the freezer until the Hancock County Health Department can be contacted. 

            West Nile virus is transmitted through the bite of a mosquito that has picked up the virus by feeding on an infected bird. Common West Nile virus symptoms include fever, nausea, headache and muscle aches. Symptoms may last from a few days to a few weeks. However, four out of five people infected with West Nile virus will not show any symptoms. In rare cases, severe illness including meningitis or encephalitis, or even death, can occur. People older than 50 are at higher risk for severe illness from West Nile virus.  According to the Center for Disease Control there are no medications to treat or vaccines to prevent WNV infection.

 Getting into the habit of reducing the number of mosquitoes around your home and neighborhood and taking personal precautions to avoid mosquito bites is the best way to prevent the West Nile Virus and other mosquito-borne illnesses.  The Illinois Department of Public Health recommends the following prevention tips; get rid of old tires, tin cans, buckets, drums, bottles or any water-holding containers; fill in or drain low places (puddles, ruts, etc.) in the yard; keep drains, ditches and culverts free of weeds and trash so water will drain properly; keep roof gutters free of leaves and other debris; cover trash containers to keep out rainwater; repair leaky pipes and outside faucets; empty plastic wading pools at least once a week and store indoors when not in use; unused swimming pools should be drained and kept dry during the mosquito season; fill in tree rot holes and hollow stumps that hold water; change the water in birdbaths and plant pots or drip trays at least once each week.  Furthermore, it is recommended to; store boats covered or upside down, or remove rainwater weekly; keep grass cut short and shrubbery well trimmed around the house so adult mosquitoes will not hide there; make sure ornamental ponds have fish that eat mosquito larvae; and repair window screens.

Personal protection recommendations include wearing shoes, socks, long pants and a long-sleeved shirt when outdoors for long periods of time, or when mosquitoes are most active. Clothing should be light colored and made of tightly woven materials to keep mosquitoes away from the skin.  Additionally, when it is necessary to be outdoors, apply insect repellent that contains 10-25% DEET.   Apply repellents to clothes whenever possible; apply sparingly to exposed skin if label permits. Consult a physician before using repellents on young children.
 If you have questions about West Nile Virus, surveillance efforts or would have found a dead bird that meets criteria, contact the Hancock County Health Department  217-357-2171 option 5 and if you have symptoms related to this virus contact your healthcare provider.

KILLIAN TODD - NEEDS YOUR HELP! TO WIN NATIONAL CONTEST

KILLIAN TODD- "THE NO DOUBTER"

KILLIAN TODD- "THE NO DOUBTER"

KILLIAN TODD, 12  A 7TH GRADER AT HAMILTON MIDDLE SCHOOL    IS ON THE ROAD TO BECOME THE  WINNER OF THE  KIDS MULLET CHAMPION.    KILLAN HAS ADVANCED TO THE 2ND ROUND AND NEEDS EVERYONE TO VOTE JULY 20TH - JULY 24TH TO MOVE ON TO ROUND 3.   

"MY MULLET IS MY FAVORITE BECAUSE EVERYDAY I GET COMPLIMENTS SAYING THAT THEY LOVE MY HAIR OR MY HAIR LOOKS REALLY GOOD ON ME.    TO BE HONEST THE REASON I GOT MY MULLET WAS BECAUSE OF A TEN DOLLAR BET WITH MY COUSIN  ON WHO COULD GROWN OUT THEIR HAIR THE LONGEST.-     MY HAIR MIGHT NOT BE GETTING ME ALL THE GIRLS BUT IT IS WINNING  CONTESTS AND I HOPE TO ADD THIS ONE TO MY LIST.  

KILLIANS' MOTHER ERICA  TODD IS SO PROUD OF HER SON, " HE DID THIS, AND MADE IT PAST ROUND ONE.   WE NEED THE COMMUNITY TO HELP KILLIAN WIN BY VOTING FOR

KILLIAN    AT   http://www.mulletchamp.com/kids_and_teens/killian-todd-the-no-doubter/

 

http://www.mulletchamp.com/kids_and_teens/killian-todd-the-no-doubter/

 

 

Final Planning and Public Meeting for 2023 Hancock County Natural Hazard Mitigation Plan

Final Planning and Public Meeting for 2023 Hancock County Natural Hazard Mitigation Plan

 

Carthage, Il. The final planning and public meetings for the update of the Hancock County Multi-Jurisdictional Natural Hazard Mitigation Plan will be held July 26, 2023, from 4-6PM at the Board in theHancock County Courthouse. The Courthouse is located at 500 Main Street, in Carthage. This meetingwill summarize the planning process, outline the mitigation strategy, address the changes from the last FEMA approved Hazard Mitigation Plan for Hancock County, and invite public comments. The participating jurisdictions in this plan are Hancock County, Basco, Carthage, Dallas City, Ferris, Hamilton, LaHarpe, Nauvoo, Pontoosuc, Warsaw, and West Point.
The planning process, funded by FEMA through the Illinois Emergency Management Agency (IEMA), requires that plans be updated every five years. Each jurisdiction is encouraged to think strategically about what they can do to reduce the risks to life and property from natural hazards. The County ESDA Coordinator, Jack Curfman, worked with University of Illinois Extension and the Illinois State Water Survey to facilitate the plan development and complete the risk Assessment.
Of special interest in this plan update is the new focus FEMA is placing on nature-based mitigation solutions as well as the impact of climate change on natural disasters and communities impacted. Types of nature-based solutions include rain gardens, such as the demonstration rain garden that was recently completed in Nauvoo as part of a Rainscaping Training by Illinois Extension and funded by the Extension Disaster Education Network (EDEN).
The public is invited to attend this meeting and also review the draft plan, which will be available on the Hancock County website as well as the university of Illinois Extension Adams, Brown, Hancock, Pike and Schuyler County website (https://extension.illinois.edu/abhps ) by July 24, 2023.
For more information regarding the Hancock County Hazard Mitigation Planning Process, contact Jack Curfman at esda@hancockcounty-il.gov or Carrie McKillip at mckillip@illinois.edu. For information regarding Illinois Extension Programs, contact the Hancock County Extension Office at (217)357-2150 or uie-abhps@illinois.edu .

WCAZ PLANTER CONCERT FRIDAY JULY 21ST 2023 AT THE HANCOCK COUNTY FAIR

   WCAZ PLANTER CONCERT   FRIDAY JULY 21ST 2023 AT THE HANCOCK COUNTY FAIR

 

CARTHAGE, IL-      WCAZ 99.1 FM  is bringing country music to Hancock County for the 2nd year  with the  2023 WCAZ Planter Concert  being held during the Hancock County Fair in Augusta Illinois July 21st.

 

Opening the 2023 concert will be  local  artist  Duke Oursler and the American Dream at 7 pm.   And while you may not know the name you will know his music Blane Howard will take the stage at 9 pm  

 

Howard who grew up in Arkansas (now residing in Nashville) was recently named Male Vocalist of the Year at the Arkansas CMA's for the 3rd time., Howard embraces his unique style of country, modern traditional, mixing the authenticity of the 90s with the contemporary edge of today!  His relatable lyrics, powerful vocals, and entertaining shows are winning him fans around the world.

LET’S CUT TO THE CHASE…

Kansas City Chiefs song:  A Chiefs fan all his life, after writing multiple parodies for several years during the playoffs, he wrote an original song Run It Back followed by the remix Take It Back.  With the two HYPE videos collecting over 2 million view, fans requested an update for the ’22-’23 season and were obliged. Howard has been interviewed on multiple TV and radio stations throughout the region due to the songs.

Mega song:  Promise To Love Her  has over 130 MILLION streams and Blane’s been all over the US and even Mexico to perform the song at weddings. The song spent 17 weeks on CMT’s 12 Pack Countdown Show.

Chart topping song writers:  Has written with Bobby Tomberlin (One More Day), Jordan Reynolds (Tequila, 10,000 hours), Keesy Timmer (Yeah, Boy), Ricky Huckabee (Beer With Jesus, Muddy Water) , Doug Johnson (Three Wooden Crosses), and others.

Tickets are available for $15 in advance at The Wood Inn, Rally Point Bar and Grill and the Dirty Bird or at the WCAZ Radio Station in Carthage.    You can also purchase tickets online  thur the WCAZ radio facebook page.    Tickets at the gate are $25.00    Kids under 12 are free with paid adult.    

 

You may not know his name now but  you will  and you'll be glad you came! Friday July 21st at the Hancock County Fair. 

 

Carl Sandburg College Trustees Adopt Budget for FY2024

Carl Sandburg College Trustees Adopt Budget for FY2024

The Carl Sandburg College Board of Trustees adopted the budget for fiscal year 2024 during its regular monthly meeting June 29 on the Main Campus in Galesburg.

 

The budget includes revenues and transfers of $33.7 million — up from $30.5 million for FY23 — and expenditures of $33 million net of building construction costs. That figure is up from $29.5 million for FY23. The budget includes $22.9 million in the college’s Building Bonds Fund toward the construction of the new Science & Technology Center and other campus construction projects. The college’s 2024 fiscal year began July 1.

 

The Board accepted two grants from the Illinois Community College Board worth more than $480,000. A Trade School Grant worth $285,910 will be used to launch the Providing Industrial Professions Experience, or PIPEline, program. The pilot program will debut in 2024 and offer career exploration, dual credit courses, apprenticeships and retention support for high school seniors interested in pursuing careers in manufacturing trades.

 

Sandburg also received a Pipeline for the Advancement of the Healthcare Workforce (PATH) grant worth $195,350. PATH allocations are used to support recruitment, retention and student support efforts for health care programs, including nursing, radiologic technology, MRI, CT, medical office professional and phlebotomy. Sandburg will use the grant to offset student costs, fund test-prep courses and provide stipends to decrease barriers to student completion.

 

President Dr. Seamus Reilly was appointed as the college’s treasurer following the April departure of Cory Gall as vice president of administrative services and CFO. The Board also approved an agreement with Clifton Larson Allen to provide accounting services not to exceed $40,000.

 

Trustees approved a list of surplus items to be put up for auction by Kyle Kelso Auctioneer. The items were deemed no longer needed, no longer meeting technological needs or were in aging condition during preparation for the construction of the Science & Technology Center.

 

The Board accepted a bid of $29,472 from Supertech to purchase a Phantom for training in the radiologic technology program. A Phantom is a simulated body that can be scanned, contains full skeleton and abdominal organ replicas and moves all major joints like human patients.

 

In other business, the Board approved the following:

  • Reimbursement of $140.34 to Lee Johnson, $304.77 to Gayle Keiser, $117.25 to Gayla Pacheco and $117.25 to Joshua Gibb for travel expenditures for Illinois Community College Trustees Association annual conference in Bloomington.
  • Funds not to exceed $124,550 to complete HVAC updates to Building G.
  • A renewed three-year contract for Vice President of Academic Services Carrie Hawkinson through June 2026.
  • Employment of Brielle Hill-Johnson as English instructor at the Branch Campus, effective July 1.
  • Employment of Ashley Reaves as dental hygiene instructor, effective July 1.
  • Employment of Jodi Pospeschil as director of the Branch Campus, effective July 1.
  • Employment of Dustin Zimmerman as associate director of financial aid, effective July 1.
  • Employment of Jason Brown as building maintenance staff, effective July 1.
  • Employment of Victor Gray as coordinator of maintenance services, effective July 16.
  • Employment of Delaney Henry as admissions and records support specialist, effective July 1.
  • Employment of Ashley Lee as Upward Bound project advisor, effective July 1.
  • Employment of Emily Collins as recruitment coordinator for career, technical and health professions, effective July 1.
  • Appointment of Douglas Ferguson as executive director of information services, effective July 1.
  • Appointment of Michelle Johnson as associate vice president of institutional resources, effective July 1.
  • Appointment of Taylor Finch-McVay as director of accreditation, effective July 1.
  • Resignation of Amy Burford as director of TRIO Student Support Services program and Gale Scholars advisor, effective July 31.
  • Resignation of Nicholas Mackey as grounds assistant, effective June 21.
  • Resignation of Seth McLaren as public safety officer, effective June 12.
  • Resignation of Gabriel Trulson as chief safety officer, effective June 30.
  • Denial of request for extension of unpaid leave of absence with non-accrual of benefits for Dean Blust.

 

The Board’s next scheduled meeting is 7 p.m. July 27 on the Main Campus in Galesburg.

HANCOCK COUNTY SHERIFFS OFFICE PRESS RELEASE JULY 7TH 2023

Sheriff Travis Duffy reports that a crash occurred on July 6, 2023 at approximately
5:57 PM just west of 98 Buchanan Street in Carthage, IL which led to one fatality.
A 2001 black Mitsubishi Eclipse driven by Karinsa K. Washburn, age 52 of
Hamilton, IL, crossed the center lane and struck a 2005 maroon Chevrolet Malibu
driven by Nancy J. Bentley, age 73 of Elvaston, IL, head on.
Carthage Fire Department was dispatched for extrication and both drivers were
treated by Hancock County EMS.
The Sheriff’s Office was later notified that Nancy Bentley succumbed to her
injuries from the crash and passed away.
Karinsa Washburn was seen at Carthage Memorial Hospital where deputies
continued their investigation. Washburn was subsequently charged with Illegal
Transportation of Alcohol by a Driver and Driving While Under the Influence of
Alcohol. Washburn was treated overnight at the hospital and then transported to
the Hancock County Jail upon her release from the hospital. Additional charges are
anticipated to be filed later today.
Carthage Police Department also responded and assisted with the crash scene and
the later investigation. The Hancock County State’s Attorney also assisted during
the investigation.
All persons charged with a crime are presumed innocent until proven guilty in a
court of law.

 

WIEC Storm Update - IF YOU DO NOT HAVE POWER STARTING AT NOON TOMORROW, FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2023, CALL THE OFFICE AT 217-357-3125 BETWEEN 12:30pm AND 4:30pm. IF IT IS AFTER HOURS, YOU CAN CALL OUR AFTER HOURS CALL CENTER AT 1-800-576-3125 OR TODD GROTTS AT 2

WIEC Storm Update - July 6, 2023, 9:00p.m.

Really good day today, several more members had their power restored! We are still hopeful by the end of the day tomorrow, we will have everyone back on that we can. There will be a few members that will not have power by end of day tomorrow due to damages to their electrical equipment.

WIEC has six substation territories. When a substation goes offline and does not have power the member in that territory also loses power. WIEC can feed that substation area from other substations to get members' power. The problem we have when we do this is that we cannot use our meter reading technology to run reports to see if members have power. The transmission line that feeds the power to the Powellton substations was destroyed! That transmission line is nine miles long and Prairie Power Inc., has started rebuilding the line, but it is going to take three to four weeks to build. So WIEC will have to feed the Powellton substation area from other substations. We will not be able to run reports to see if you are out of power. The past several days WIEC lineman have been driving the lines physically to see who has power and who does not.

IF YOU DO NOT HAVE POWER STARTING AT NOON TOMORROW, FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2023, CALL THE OFFICE AT 217-357-3125 BETWEEN 12:30pm AND 4:30pm. IF IT IS AFTER HOURS, YOU CAN CALL OUR AFTER HOURS CALL CENTER AT 1-800-576-3125 OR TODD GROTTS AT 217-357-7342.

Please let your family, neighbors, friends and anyone else that may not have Facebook know this. We will also try to get this on our website along with WCAZ radio.

- July 6, 2023, 9:00p.m.

Really good day today, several more members had their power restored! We are still hopeful by the end of the day tomorrow, we will have everyone back on that we can. There will be a few members that will not have power by end of day tomorrow due to damages to their electrical equipment.

WIEC has six substation territories. When a substation goes offline and does not have power the member in that territory also loses power. WIEC can feed that substation area from other substations to get members' power. The problem we have when we do this is that we cannot use our meter reading technology to run reports to see if members have power. The transmission line that feeds the power to the Powellton substations was destroyed! That transmission line is nine miles long and Prairie Power Inc., has started rebuilding the line, but it is going to take three to four weeks to build. So WIEC will have to feed the Powellton substation area from other substations. We will not be able to run reports to see if you are out of power. The past several days WIEC lineman have been driving the lines physically to see who has power and who does not.

IF YOU DO NOT HAVE POWER STARTING AT NOON TOMORROW, FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2023, CALL THE OFFICE AT 217-357-3125 BETWEEN 12:30pm AND 4:30pm. IF IT IS AFTER HOURS, YOU CAN CALL OUR AFTER HOURS CALL CENTER AT 1-800-576-3125 OR TODD GROTTS AT 217-357-7342.

Please let your family, neighbors, friends and anyone else that may not have Facebook know this. We will also try to get this on our website along with WCAZ radio.

J.R. PARN WITH

MEALIFF INSURANCE IS A HOMETOWN AGENT WITH THE BIG COMPANY COVERAGE SEE THEM FOR ALL YOUR INSURANCE NEEDS

 

Carl Sandburg College Announces 2023 Spring Semester Graduates

Carl Sandburg College Announces 2023 Spring Semester Graduates

 

GALESBURG — Carl Sandburg College has announced the names of students who have completed graduation requirements and graduated from the College at the end of the 2023 spring semester and pre-summer session.

 

ASSOCIATE DEGREES

ASSOCIATE IN ARTS

Abingdon — Chase Allen, Willow Shoop, Irie Woods

Avon — Talon Hunter, Ronan Pompeo

Basco — Sierra Lucie

Bushnell — Abbey Donaldson

Cambridge — Nicholas Janson

Cameron — Danielle Bowling

Carmel, Ind. — Jack Bruington

Carthage — Holly Boyles, Emily Bruns, Emma Nelson, Alivia Smith, Devon Smith

Dahinda — Lindsey Williams

Dallas City — Tyler Courtois

East Galesburg — Hallie Price

Edwards — Jacob Abenroth, Logan VanHeuklon

Elmwood — Charles Shissler

Farmington — Abigail Simpson

Galesburg — Letiya Bradford, Carly Crowl, Veronica Denisar, Sally Fischell, Hunter Frymire, Madeline Gonzalez, Natalie Gonzalez, Dieter Horten, Mercy Jerono, Aaron Kennelly, Calton Kibet, Brian Kipchemis, Emmanuel Kiprop, Faith Kiprop, Courtney Livingston, Benie Mbanani, Emma Nelson, Mary Njuguna, Santiago Palacio, Zachary Sandoval, Leigha Schisler, Abby Tucker, Cole Warnsing, Abby Wilson, Nick Winters

Gifford — Anna Duden

Hamilton — Audrey Geers, Adelyn Knowles, Myra Vahle

Industry — Nicholas Seaver

Knoxville — Rosalind Flater, Jason Hise

Laura — Abigail Smith

Lewistown — Johnni Baldwin

Little York — Emma Colbrese

Macomb — Riley Creasey

Monmouth — Daniela Alcala-Ramirez, Payton Bearden, Maria Chavez, Mollie Clark, Noah Clark, Mallory Cooper, Dorcas Ekola, Michelle Hernandez, Allison Juarez, Jankibahen Patel, Adjele, Wilson Bahun

Oneida — Elijah Asplund, Aleesha Jones

Pekin — Chelsey Catton, Alaura Clark

Peoria — Lillianna Blackford, Matthew Schmitt, Jadyn Swan

Peoria Heights — Jonathon Shields

Princeville — Chase Williams

Quincy — Lauren Erke

Rantoul — Cole Hanks

St. Peters, Mo. — Myles Estrada

Tennessee — Sage Wilde

Trivoli — Lily Sharum

Wataga — Daniel McDowell

Williamsfield — Cadence Manning, Graham Wight

 

ASSOCIATE IN GENERAL STUDIES

Carthage — Paige Blankenship, Devon Smith

Dahinda — Caitlin Sherman

Galesburg — Courtney Arnold, Lucus Fones, Mason Fones, Lucas Garcia, Alexis Hankins, Alyssa Mixon, Rachel Sotelo, Brandie Swanson, Abby Tucker, Tasha Wallace

Gilson — Tyler Nelson

Gladstone — Jayde Henry

Lewistown — Johnni Baldwin

Marietta — Kierstyn Pemble

Monmouth — Griselda Rico

Nauvoo — Bianca Hill

New Windsor — Madison Woodward

North Henderson — Jennifer McCutcheon

Pekin — Chelsey Catton

Peoria — Matthew Schmitt

Princeville — Chase Williams

Victoria — Catherine Wetzel

 

ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE

Abingdon — Clay Slagel

Avon — Ronan Pompeo

Belknap — Logan Korte

Bushnell — Gracie Havens

Dunlap — Jack Barham, Ian Donaldson

East Moline — Griffin Ronnebeck

Fulton — Connor Barnett

Galesburg — Josue Bashombe, Olyvia Bell, Alex Buchen, Benjamin Hilton, Jasmin McDaniel, Bryce Nordstrom, Noah Nordstrom, Erik Peterson, Ashtin Schisler, Leigha Schisler, Molly Warren

Grimes, Iowa — Maliyah Martin

Lewistown — Johnni Baldwin

Little York — Emma Colbrese

Mahomet — Brett Giese

Monmouth — Quinn Ramos Noel, George Seals

Pekin — Chelsey Catton, Natalie Righi

Sterling — Olivia Schwingle

 

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE

Accounting

Galesburg — Alyssa Gooley, Meagan Nunez

 

Administrative Office Professional

Sherrard — Kayla Wilson

 

Business Administration

Central City, Iowa — Hunter Caves

Galesburg — Amanda Linze, Hanah Vancil

Heath, Ohio — Kendra Wiechmann

 

Dental Hygiene

Amboy — Kelynn Boyle

Bettendorf, Iowa — Hannah Healey

Camanche, Iowa — Seanna Lamberton

Canton — Erin Gosnell, Josie Kinsel

Caputa, S.D. — Izabell Bartels

Clinton, Iowa — Selena Tello

Colona — Marissa Block

Davenport, Iowa — Lintrice Mayes, David Thai

East Moline — Joanitha Wilson

East Peoria — Natalee Logsdon

Erie — Katie Hebeler

Farmington — Meghan Wherley

Galesburg — Vanessa Gibbs, Ashley Reinstadtler

Mendon — Addison Eger

Milan — Addyson Hanson

Monmouth — Alanjair Castro Medrano, Christophe Moma

Plainfield — Erin Wiesbrook

Quincy — Taylor Leindecker

Rock Island — Taylor Vols

Rushville — Addison Curry

Silvis — Yvette Caudillo, Yoliztly Flores

Sperry, Iowa — Kelsi Rowe

 

Emergency Medical Services-Paramedic

Rock Island — Kyle Bates

 

Information Technology & Cyber Security

Galesburg — James Cunningham, Timothy Greig, Franck Nsimbi

Monmouth — Nanette Kapesa

 

Medical Office Professional

Roseville — Hunter Porter

 

Mortuary Science

Blue Grass, Iowa — Hunter Vastine

Galesburg — Hallie Buttry

Hutchinson, Kan. — Sarah Peterson

Macomb — Ryan Thorman

Peoria — Nicole Heald

Rushville — Jonah Phelps

 

Nursing

Abingdon — Bessie Snider, Chrissie Spitzig, Amber Sandman

Aledo — Stevie Engle

Alexis — Jennifer Cornell, Taylor Tipsword

Bettendorf, Iowa — Gurpreet Kaur

Cambridge — Melissa Glidden

Colona — Alysia Anderson

Galesburg — Jennifer Hamilton, Ivette Leon, Natalie Cantwell, Isabelle Esquivel, Melissa Howard, Kimberly Ives Greene, Suleimi Lopez Garcia, Alaina Mulnix, Rylie Scales, Elijah Secor, Sara Wood

Geneseo — Corrie Brabson, Kimberly Depauw

Lynn Center — Santana Terronez

Maquon — Corey Morrison

Monmouth — Kaitlyn Aguilara

Rio — Danielle Howard

Wataga — Cheyenne Malcolm

 

Radiologic Technology

Abingdon — Kylah Brown

Bushnell — Myleena English

Galesburg — Sarah Allen, Jamison Littlefield, Katherine Schoessling

Monmouth — Andrea Avalos

Oneida — Kayla Dillbeck

St. David — Caleb Keithley

Silvis — Tanner Kennedy

 

CERTIFICATES

Accounting

Chillicothe — Kayla Wolf

Roseville — Janelle Walker

 

Administrative Office Assistant

Sherrard — Kayla Wilson

 

Advanced Welding

Alexis — Avery Leffler

East Galesburg — Clifford Thurman

Galesburg — Michael Briscolino, Navin Davis, Alayna Fuller, Kaden Johnson

Kirkwood — Sullivan Ross

Monmouth — Cole Cooper

Roseville — Max Warrington

 

Automotive Technology

Avon — Genevieve Johnston

Galesburg — Austin Carter, Demojhea Flunder, Cajun Hulse, Brandon O’Reilly

Monmouth — Tristan Adwell

 

Basic Welding

Alexis — Avery Leffler

East Galesburg — Clifford Thurman

Galesburg — Michael Briscolino, Navin Davis, Alayna Fuller, Kaden Johnson

Kirkwood — Sullivan Ross

Monmouth — Cole Cooper

Roseville — Max Warrington

 

Cisco Network Security

Monmouth — Alexis Clark

 

Computer Technician

Galesburg — Michael Christensen, Mason Fones, Devon Gavel, Nicholas Lombardi

Monmouth — Alexis Clark, Janet Pratt

Oneida — Nicholas Behringer

 

Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management

Galesburg — Alejandro Nunez

 

Medical Office Assistant

Monmouth — Lynette Liggett

 

HANCOCK COUNTY- Office of the Chief County Assessment Officer

“If your dwelling or any other taxable structures were rendered uninhabitable, damaged
or destroyed during the storms that impacted Hancock County on June 29 th , 2023 you
are entitled to a pro-ration/reduction of the assessed value on those affected structures
for the 2023 assessment year. This pro-ration/reduction will affect the taxes paid in
2024.
You will need to fill out a “PTAX-761 Request for Reduction Due to Destruction” form.
This form is available on the front page of our website and under “Documents & Forms”
on the Supervisor of Assessments Office page. The PTAX-761 form can also be picked up
at the assessment office (main floor of the county courthouse, room 2).
Pursuant to 35 ILCS 200/9-180, affected property owners have until Wednesday,
September 27th, 2023 (90 Days) to return the forms to the Hancock County Assessment
Office. Forms received after this date will result in the property being re-evaluated for
the 2024 assessment year, taxes payable in 2025.
If you have further questions, please call or visit the Hancock County Assessment Office.

Sincerely,
Kasey Mehaffy
Chief County Assessment Officer
Hancock County

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